The other side to ancient Iran, with an abundance of culture & history, is its breathtaking four season nature which has no shortage of scenic views. Among the very best sits the holistic Mount Damavand wrapped in snow on its cap all year round, a popular destination for trekking lovers.

The volcanic Damavand, inactive for more than 38500 years, rises above the clouds at 5671 meters (18606 feet) and has crater with a 400-meter diameter. The region harbors a great variety of wildlife, vegetation and natural features such as huge glaciers & sulfuric hill at the peak besides its hot springs situated in lower level skirts.

Cited in Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh, Damavand has deep roots in Persians beliefs and faith. There are 16 routes towards the peak with various degree of difficulty, making the Mount one of the most accessible peaks globally in class of 5000+ meters.

The southern face climb goes all the way up from Polur Village and your journey begins here. Your trekking adventure to Damavand summit starts from Polur. Read on to find out about the most exciting climb in Middle East happening to be the highest!

Itinerary of Damavand Trekking Tour is found here.

Damavand

Damavand

 

Polur

 

A heaven in the heart of hot summer days, the mountainous village of Polur (Pūlūr) becomes an ultimate destination for trekking camps base, most of which heading towards the splendid Mount Damavand – the highest peak in Mid-East.

Located at a height of 2300 meters, Polur sees dozens of wildflowers growing after snowmelt runoff occurs in mid-April followed by flourishing of yellow & Anemone flowers in late May & June.

This serene area, booming with tourists, backpackers and climbers specially in hot seasons, is believed to be home to some ancient hoards, artifacts and other treasure troves which besides the perfect weather has drawn attention to itself. Although some of these are based on legends, there’s been Glasswares & Ceramics dating back to Parthian, Sassanids and early Islam era of Iran found here.

Other belief of the villagers is that, long back in time there once lived maidens of a legendary King up here in a citadel worshiping Water.

This castle resembles the one in Firouzabad Shiraz, namely Qaleh Dokhtar (The Maiden Castle) – a castle made by Ardashir I 209 AD.

 

The highest waterfall of Mazandaran Province, Shahandasht Waterfall at a height of 180 meters is one of many tourist attractions of the area which is near Polur village, an approximate 40-minute drive away.

A rock climbing site in Polur Complex welcomes climbers in different types such as Bouldering, Top Rope & Competition in a 900 square meter area.

Damavand

Damavand

Rineh Hot Spring

 

On south face climbs you’ll come across one amazing natural gem, the Rineh Thermal Springs. Located 21km away from Mount Damavand this natural attraction has several bathtubs and pools.

Different options of residence are available here and people mainly come here for its therapeutic properties from Metropolis of Tehran and other nearby towns each and every day.

 

The pleasant weather combined health benefits of thermal waters has made Rineh a popular spot not only for mountaineering adventurers but also for others looking for some quality leisure time.

 

Goosfand Sara

Goosfand Sara

Goosfand Sara (Sheepfold) or Modque Base camp

 

Goosfandsara is a mountain camping site located at 3050m altitude and is one main point as a stop in trekking to Damavand Summit. In this area there is a small mountain shelter or refuge, a mosque called Saheb Zaman (or Saheb al Zaman) and a sheepfold!

The climbing season sees to itself a lot of SUVs transferring climbers and their equipment to this campsite. Mules and porters are other means of transport available here on your way to the last campsite called Bargah Sevom.

 

Damavand

Damavand

 

Third Camp – Bargah Sevom

Coming up to the next and the last camp before reaching the top, is located Bargah Sevom at a level of 4150 meter. Standing up there you already are getting breathtaking views under your feet.

 

There is an old shelter, considered the oldest camp of Mount Damavand, and a newer hut built in 2009.

The trek towards the summit would take roughly 5-7 hours depending on physical conditions.

Plan your trip to Damavand as the best time is just now. This trek to the very top of Damavand has been labeled as a MUST and will be a unique experience you’ll never forget.

By Omid Mirzaie

 

Our lovely traveler, Priska Seisenbacher, a professional photographer chooses Kalout Travel Agency for its travel to Iran. In her fourth trip to Iran, she travels to the only UNESCO World Heritage Natural site of Iran, Dasht-e Lut in order to see Iran from different angle. Priska tries to capture the unique beauty of Lut Desert through its lens which are truly amazing and wonderful.

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Read her own words and see her feelings through these splendid pictures.

Priska Seisenbacher’s own words:

Our trip through Iran’s desert Dasht-e Lut

The fourth journey to Iran gave us the opportunity to explore the Dasht-e Lut much deeper than the short trip to the Kalouts just next to the road in 2016. Known as the hottest place of the world (because of several temperature records) the Lut is definetely worth a visit.

As we wanted to follow an off-road adventure this time it was pretty clear that we would have to drive with two jeeps to guarantee our safety in all the loneliness. Starting in Shafiabad we trusted in our well experienced guides to find a way to another superlative: The biggest sand dunes of the world are located a one day drive from the little village. Even we have seen a lot of other beautiful places in the deserts of Iran this trip amazed us because of the huge sand dunes and the variety of desert landscapes. So I am really convinced that such an off-road trip is one of the best desert trips you can do in the world. But also if it is such a beautiful area not many western people know it as a place to visit. That and the huge proportions of the area are the main reasons why we have not seen any other people during our three day trip through the Dasht-e Lut.

Thanks for the great trip! Kalout Kalout Adventures

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

 

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

Priska Seisenbacher In Extenso Photography

 

Travel unique with Kalout Travel Agency!

Mesr Desert

The Mesr Desert is located in the far east of Isfahan province in central Iran, 420 km far from Isfahan, and 371 km far from Yazd. Mesr is a desert and also an oasis in the central desert of Iran, Dashte-Kavir.

Mesr Desert

Mesr Desert

 

Reaching the Mesr Desert is easy, although you need to change directions several times from the major cities of Iran, around 250 kilometers drive onto the Naein-Tabas road from Isfahan west to east. After passing Farokhi and Nasrabad villages, there is a sign showing off-road direction:” Toward Mesr.” Upon 43 kilometers drive from the sign across the sand hills, three green spots will appear from far, similar to three emeralds next to each other.

Mesr Desert

Mesr Desert

A few moments later, while the absolute silence of desert is your only company, you will find yourself in the first emerald land, Amirabad. The road is totally flat which is considered as one of the wonders of Iran’s central desert and surprises every Eco-tourist. The sand hills around the village are known as “thrones” since strong wind has shaped the surface, forming strange and attractive figures. Amirabad is a vast and prosperous farm with a deep well. Mesr’s residents are the owners of Amirabad, where even a drop of water is as precious as gold; the well provides drinking and agricultural water for Mesr.

Mesr Desert

Mesr Desert

By exploring Amirabad, for a moment, you completely forget that you are in the center of a desert. As if you are walking in a village in northern Iran: The weather is pleasant and cool and the wheat and barley farms are green, specially in the spring. In Amirabad, the road is split and the left road goes across the golden sand hills to Jandagh, a city on the Na’in-Tabas-Damghan main road. The right path directly goes to the second emerald, the center of Mesr.

Nain Attraction Spots

Jomeh Mosque

Jomeh Mosque

Nain lies 170 km north of Yazd, and 140 km east of Isfahan. With an area of almost 35,000 km², Nain lies at an altitude of 1545 m above sea level. Like much of the Iranian plateau, it has a desert climate, with a maximum temperature of 41 °C in summer, and a minimum of -9 °C in winter.

More than 3,000 years ago, Persians learned how to construct aqueducts underground to bring water from the mountains to the plains. In the 1960s, this ancient system provided more than 70 percent of the water used in Iran. Nain is one of the best places in the whole world to see these qanats functioning.

Unique to Nain are some of the most outstanding monuments of Iran: the Jame Mosque, one of the first four mosques built in Iran after the Arab invasion; the Pre-Islamic Narej Fortress; a Pirnia traditional house; the Old Bazaar; Rigareh, a qanat-based watermill; and a Zurkhaneh (a place for traditional sport).

Besides its magnificent monuments, Nain is also famous for high-quality carpets and wool textile and home- made pastry called “copachoo.” Some linguists believe the word “Nain” may have been derived from the name of one of the descendants of the prophet Noah, who was called “Naen”. Many local people speak an ancient Sasani Pahlavi dialect, the same dialect spoken by the Zoroastrians in Yazd today. Other linguists state that the word Nain is derived from the word “Nei” (“straw” in English) which is a marsh plant.

Nain Congregational Mosque

Nain’s congregational mosque is one of the oldest mosques in Iran. But it still has its original architecture and is in use and protected by Iran’s Cultural Heritage Organization. According to the French professor, Arthur Pops, the mosque’s foundation dates back to the 9th century. It has a very simple plan, but very beautiful. The mosque contains a central rectangular courtyard that is surrounded by hypostyles on three sides. At one of these hypostyles, the mihrab of the mosque is located. It is a niche on the wall that shows the direction of “Qebleh” in Mecca, the holy city that Moslems pray toward five times a day. This mihrab has an amazing stucco work decoration, probably created during the 9th or the 10th century. Beside it, there is a wooden altar with delicate wooden inlay work. The Mosque also has a 28-meter-high minaret belonging to the Seljuk Era, the 10th century.

Nain Jame Mosque Iran

Nain Jame Mosque Iran

 

Pirnia Traditional House

Pirnia traditional house and ethnology museum is situated opposite the congregational mosque. A typical example of this region’s desert houses, in terms of architecture and art, belonging to the Safavid Period. The house consists of an exterior, an interior, a deep garden, a silo room and all the facilities of a lord’s house. When you enter the house and pass the first corridor, you reach an octagonal room called “hashti”, a waiting room for visitors. Beautiful paintings, amazing plasterwork of Qur’an stories, a book of famous poems and calligraphy frames decorate the living room. First, the judge of Nain lived there. Then, during the Qajar Period, the governor of Nain lived in this house. Just a few decades ago, the house was purchased by the Ministry of Culture and Art. After renovation in 1994, the house was converted into the desert ethnology museum.

Pirnia traditional house

Pirnia traditional house

 

Nain’s Mosallah edifice

Nain’s Mosallah edifice is another must-see. Its vast garden was a popular recreational area until recently. The mausoleum inside the Mosallah was a pilgrimage site for visitors. There is a water reservoir (ab-anbar) on one side of the garden, which can be accessed through a stairway. Water in this reservoir got cooled by two wind towers. It was in use until a few years ago. The architectural style of Mosallah has the characteristics of Qajar dynasty, and a number of literary, political and religious figures are buried at this site. “Mosallah” is an Arabic word for a place of prayer, but no one knows if any praying was ever done at this location. Mosallah is an octagonal mausoleum of dervishes and Qajar and Pahlavi political figures. It’s encompassed by a military fort from Qajar era, with a high wall. The pistachio trees around the turquoise-domed mausoleum and two tall wind towers make the complex really photogenic.

Nain’s Mosallah edifice

Nain’s Mosallah edifice

 

Narin Ghale

Narin Ghal’e is one of the most important monuments of the province dating back to the period before the advent of Islam in Iran, and has been recorded as one of the national buildings. This ancient castle has been constructed on top of Galeen hill and overlooks the city. It seems that upper floors of the building have been reconstructed and belong to the Islamic era. One part of the building was destroyed in the course of road construction during the reign of Pahlavi II.

is one of the most important monuments of the province dating back to the period before the advent of Islam in Iran, and has been recorded as one of the national buildings. This ancient castle has been constructed on top of Galeen hill and overlooks the city. It seems that upper floors of the building have been reconstructed and belong to the Islamic era. One part of the building was destroyed in the course of road construction during the reign of Pahlavi II.

Narin Ghale

Narin Ghale

 

Nain’s bazaar

Nain’s bazaar is a remarkable historical attraction. It extends 340 m from the Gate of Chehel Dokhtaran to Khajeh Khezr mosque, and is connected by main alleys, and tributary passages, to various neighbourhood centers. The bazaar has two main crossroads (chahar su). Parts of it have been renovated, and its many varied stalls were active until a few years ago. However, at present, the bazaar is almost deserted, since the retailers have moved to the city’s street shops. Some important monuments, such as the Sheikh Maghrebi mosque, Khajeh mosque, and Chehel Dokhtaran’s Hosseinieh are nearby.

Nain’s bazaar

Nain’s bazaar

 

Fatemi House

Fatemi House is the largest traditional house in Nain. It’s opposite Narin Castle, beside the old bazaar. The house belonged to a very influential family in Nain. It consists of a large number of sections, each with a different function: summer and winter living rooms, resting rooms, stable, silos, corridors, dining rooms for guests, and other facilities. Most of the rooms are furnished with stained glass windows, inlaid wooden doors, and plasterwork. The house belongs to the Cultural Heritage Organization.

Fatemi House

Fatemi House

Kharanaq is another town in Yazd district. The word Kharanaq means “the Sun’s place of birth”.

Kharanaq View

Kharanaq View

Geography of Kharanaq

This deserted and crumbling mud-brick village is situated in a remote valley about 70km north of Yazd in central Iran. The site has been occupied for approximately 4,000 years, while the dilapidated adobe buildings that draw foreigners from around the world dating back to 1,000 years ago. This crumbling mud brick city has been occupied by humans for over 4,000 years. There’s a new town situated 2km from the old one where the remaining residents of Karanaq live. Mostly 400 people save for a few elderly people who refuse to leave, but it is the old town that attracts the attention of visitors and photographers. It is a fascinating place to walk through with its winding and decaying alleys, tunnels and spaces, placed in a picturesque valley.

Kharanaq Old Texture

Kharanaq Old Texture

 

Kharanaq Texture

Kharanaq is divided into two parts – the old town and the new town. The old town is almost completely deserted, and the new town is where about 130 families continue to live. The old town was constructed with sun-baked mud bricks, forming one of the largest collections of adobe buildings in Iran. The abandoned town is a photographer’s dream with a labyrinth of streets, tunnels, passageways, and rooms, as well as more impressive buildings such as a tiny mosque, a shaking minaret, and an old caravanserai that welcomed merchants and pilgrims centuries ago. It was once a prosperous farming village, but when water supplies dried up the inhabitants left, leaving the town to turn to ruins. In recent years, a new town was constructed within 2km of the ancient town with government-supplied water and electricity. There have existed cities whose population declined. There are the obvious reasons like war and famine, but what else can cause a once vibrant place to decline in population to such an extent that it becomes practically uninhabited? This is a question that rises while exploring the ruins of the abandoned ghost town of Kharanaq.

Kharanaq Bridge

Kharanaq Bridge

Less populated & Less known

The reason that Kharanaq was abandoned may have been drought. Once possessing drinking water and fertile farmland, the city lost the entire lifeblood, and people gradually moved to seek opportunities either in Yazd or the mines nearby. Most people started to leave Kharanaq in the 1940s. Until the 1970s there were still some residents who believed the city was worth saving but even those determined stragglers eventually gave up on Kharanaq. Most of the remaining residents are those who are too old and poor to move about. One of the most eye-catching monuments in the city, and one of the few restored buildings is the 15- metre- tall Shaking Minaret of Kharanaq, dating back to the 17th century, frequently vibrating. Nobody knows why. Visitors to Kharanaq quickly learn that the words “watch your step” are very important, as the city is literally crumbling away and many of the surfaces are less than stable. I’m sure that once Iran becomes the popular tourist destination it deserves to be, lots of tourists will go to Kharanaq to see the ancient ghost town, there’s nobody around and you’re free to go wherever you want in the city.

 

Garmeh

 

Top View of Garmeh

Top View of Garmeh

 

Dreamland in desert

If you have the dream of going to a real oasis in the desert, you shouldn’t miss Garmeh, a palm tree clad village with an abundance of water and crops, in the middle of sand plains. A place where you can sit by a well in the shadow of a tree in comlete silence and watch the occasional heard of sheep pass by. That’s exactly what Garmeh is like. Somewhere in Iran’s central desert, Dashte- kavir, lies this tiny village irrigated by a small mountain spring. Garmeh has been welcoming travelers from all over the world for hundreds of years as it used to be one of the rest spots on the famous silk road.

Hidden Oasis

Garmeh is the capital of Garmeh County in  North Khorasan province. One of the most important monuments of this city is Jalaleddin fortress, which is inherited from Khwarazmian Dynasty. The fortress was established by the command of Jalaleddin Kharazmshah in order to defend it against the Moguls’ attack in the seventh Hijri century. It was built on the top of a hill with a hexagonal foundation. A well exists inside the fortress which seems to be natural. The other monument of this city is Bagh-e-Mazar tomb.

Mud Texture Structure

Mud Texture Structure

What to do in Garmeh?

During your stay in Garmeh, depending on your time, you can go for a walk among palm trees, relax in a spring or climb the nearest mountain or hill to enjoy the surrounding sceneries.You can also visit other villages nearby like Ordib, Iraj and Dadkin with gardens and mountains, Bayazeh and its castle, Abgarm and its thermal spring.80kms from Garmeh, on the way to Tabas, there’s a salt lake, and 80km from Garmeh to Jandaq you will find Mesr and Farahzad villages and the sand dunes surrounding you.

Salt

Salt

History of Garmeh

The documented history of human settlement in the area dates back to 4000 years ago, but there exists some relatively reliable evidence that suggests human habitation as far back as 7000 years. From about 2000 years ago, the oasis was placed on the Silk Road and therefore, on the main trading route between China and Europe. As a result, many travelers have passed through this area. A famous Persian poet, philosopher and explorer, Naser Khosrow passed through the area about 950 years ago and has mentioned this area in his travel diary. As for well-known European travelers of the recent centuries, we can mention Seven Hedin and Alfonse Gabriel, who visited Garmeh in the last century.

The town’s only water source, close to the heart of the village, is the only source of life for the gardens and Date Palm orchards that make this oasis such a special place. The main activity for the natives during this incredibly long period had been some form of agriculture and animal husbandry in unforgiving conditions that are the reality of this land.

Garmeh Desert

Garmeh Desert

Don’t miss photography!

This picturesque village also has many attractions which makes it a popular spot for so many tourists from all over the world. There are beautiful palm trees in the southern flank of the village. The weather is great in spring, fall and winter. There is an old four-floor citadel in Garmeh which dates back to the Sassanid period and has been attracting so many archeologists.

The eye-catching alleys of Garmeh which are decorated with beautiful Sabbats attract so many filmmakers to Garmeh. Garmeh lakes are the habitat for ducks in spring and winter and the hills are home to partridges.

Palm Tree

Palm Tree

There is a natural spring which has been flowing for thousands of years and creates a good ecosystem for different types of small fish. There are elephant-like mountains around with red soil containing iron. Its pleasant silence and the starry nights, along with the sound of water and the movement of palm trees, attract lots of tourists from all over the world to this area.

Handicrafts of Garmeh are mostly created out of palm leaves which is a good souvenir for international tourists. The residents of Garmeh speak Pahlavi language which is the oldest language in Iran. The Mesr Desert, near Garmeh, attracts lots of tourists every year. There is also a thermal spring near Garmeh which has many therapeutic benefits and is useful in treating Arthritis.

The Dasht-e Kavir, is one of two deserts dominating the region’s landscape, is a mix of sand and salt as blinding in its whiteness as it is deafening in its silence. Dasht-e Kavir, is also known as “Kavir-e Namak” and “Great Salt Desert”, is a large desert lying in the middle of the Iranian plateau, around 300 kilometers east-southeast of Tehran. Dasht-e-Kavir desert is approximately 800 kilometers long and 320 kilometers wide, and composed of mud and salt marshes. Millions of years ago, this region was occupied by a salt-rich ocean that covers a small piece of continent in what is now central Iran. As the time passes, the ocean gets dried up, it left behind a layer of salt as much as 6 to 7 kilometers thick.

Therefore, over the time, the layer of salt was buried under a thick layer of mud; however salt has a fairly low density lower than the layer of mud and rocks underneath which the salt layer lay. So it taking place pushing up through the overlying sediment and finally, over millions of years, the salt broke through and formed domes. The salt domes of Dasht-e Kavir are probably some of the best examples of this geological marvel. Thus, geologists have recognized about 50 large salt domes in this region. Some of the domes have been eroded away by wind and rain exposing its cross-section.

However, the desert climate is arid and receives little rain and snow each year, but the surrounding mountains on all side, provide plenty of runoff to create vast seasonal lakes, marshlands and playas. Temperatures can reach 50 °C in summer, and the average temperature in January is 22 °C. Though it looks like a firm surface, the salt crust is only a few inches thick, below which lies soft grease-like mud the Iranians called “Charbeh” that is really difficult to get out of if one were to get stuck. Due to arduous travelling to Dasht-e Kavir, it is very dangerous. The soil is sterile and not appropriate for cultivation. In summer the hot temperatures cause extreme vaporization, which leaves the marshes and mud grounds with large crusts of salt. Heavy storms frequently occur and they can cause sand hills reaching up to 40 m in height. Some parts of Dasht- e Kavir have a more steppe-like appearance.

Dasht-e-Kavir desert is almost uninhabited and only partly explored. Wild sheep, camels, goats and Persian leopards also live in the mountainous areas. Hence, human settling is restricted to scattered oases, where wind-blocking housing constructions are raised to deal with the tough weather conditions. Some live in the hills and the surrounding mountains. Against the odds, oases exist within these desolate environs, home to villages that are sustained by the wells of sweet water that have been part of desert mythology for centuries. Vegetation in the Dasht-e Kavir is adapted to common plant species like shrubs and grasses can only be found in some valleys and on mountain tops. So, the most widespread plant is mugwort. The Persian ground jay is a bird species living in some parts of the desert plateaus, along with Houbara bustards, Persian gazelles, camel, goats, leopards, larks and sandgrouses.

Moreover night life brings on wild cats, wolves, foxes, and other carnivores, the Persian onager and Asiatic cheetah can be seen. Lizards and snakes live in different places in the central plateau. The extreme heat and storms in Dasht-e Kavir cause extensive erosion, which makes it almost impossible to cultivate any lands almost uninhabited and knows little exploitation. Camel and sheep breeding and agriculture are the sources of living to the few people living on its soil. For irrigation, Iranians developed a sophisticated system of water-wells known as qanats. These are still in use, and modern globally used water-revenue systems are based on their techniques.

 

Dasht-e-Kavir

Like swirls of paint on an enormous canvas, shallow lakes, mudflats, and salt marshes share the sinuous valleys on Iran’s largely uninhabited Dasht-e Kavir, or Great Salt Desert. This image was acquired by Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus sensor.

 

Dasht-e Kavir, or the Great Salt Desert National Park, is a large desert lying in the middle of the Iranian plateau about 300 kilometers east-southeast of Tehran. A total surface area of about 77,600 km2 makes it the Earth’s 26th largest desert. This desert stretches from Alborz mountain range in the north-west to Dasht-e- Lut in the south-east and is partitioned between the Iranian provinces of Khorasan, Semnan, Tehran, Isfahan and Yazd. This amazing desert is about 800 kilometers long, and more than 320 kilometers wide, and composed of mud and salt marshes. Tens of millions of years ago, this region was occupied by a salt-rich ocean that surrounded a small piece of continent in what is now central Iran. As the ocean dried up, it left behind a layer of salt as much as 6 to 7 kilometers thick. Over time, the layer of salt was buried under a thick layer of mud. But salt has a fairly low density, lower than the layer of mud and rocks underneath. So it started pushing up through the overlying sediment and eventually, over millions of years, the salt got out and formed domes. The salt domes of Dasht-e-Kavir are probably some of the best examples of this geological phenomenon.

Salt-Desert-Dasht-e-Kavir_Kashan-Iran

Salt-Desert-Dasht-e-Kavir_Kashan-Iran

 

Dasht-e Kavir’s climate is arid and receives little rain and snow during the year. However, the surrounding mountains on all sides provide plenty of runoff to create vast seasonal lakes, marshlands and playas. Temperatures can reach 50 °C in summer, and the average temperature in January is 22 °C. Day and night temperatures during a year can differ up to 70 °C. Rain usually falls in winter.

dasht-e_kavir

dasht-e_kavir

The desert soil is covered with sand and pebbles. There are marshes, seasonal lakes and seasonal river beds. The hot temperatures cause extreme vaporization, which leaves the marshes and mud grounds with large crusts of salt. Heavy storms frequently occur and they can cause sand hills reaching up to 40 m in height. Some parts of Dasht-e-Kavir have a more steppe-like appearance.

Geologists have identified about 50 large salt domes in this region some of which have been eroded away by wind and rain exposing its cross-section.

 

Dasht-e Kavir Iran

Dasht-e Kavir Iran

Although it looks like a hard surface, the salt crust is only a few inches thick, below which lies soft grease-like mud that Iranians call “Charbeh”, which is extremely difficult to get out of if one gets stuck in. Due to this fact, travelling in Dasht-e-Kavir is extremely dangerous. The soil is sterile and not suitable for cultivation. The desert is almost uninhabited and only partly explored. Human settling is restricted to scattered oases, where wind-blocking housing constructions are raised to deal with the harsh weather conditions. Some live in the hills and the surrounding mountains. Wild sheep, camels, goats and Persian leopards also live in the mountainous areas.

 

5 Special Offer for Autumn Cruise

The journey will not end only in the summer and its long days.The new season of travel to new areas begins with the coming of autumn.Pleasant weather,the smell of rain and colorful trees has prepared the best season for nature lovers.
Iran is a four-season country and due this particular feature you can visit some part of Iran in different seasons.
Traveling in Iran is not limited to spring or autumn.At any time, a part of this beautiful country prepares a special trip location for you.Autumn in Iran has different choices for you.The deserts provide the best trip for you in this season. Simultaneously,the northern forests of Iran are waiting for desert travelers with millions of colors.

We have 5 special offers for your autumn trip that you will have a memorable and colorful autumn tour in Iran.

Desert tourism
Autumn is the best season for lovers of the desert.In this season, the extreme heat of the desert and the cold of the nights are both tolerable.Since Iran is a desert country, then you will have different choices to travel to one of the beautiful deserts of Iran.
Maranjab desert near Tehran will have the best and the closest access to you.In addition, in this desert area you can visit all the features of the Iranian desert region in a small area as like as Sandy hills,SaltLake,Sandy roads,
The Silk Road,Desert Wildlife and other features of the desert areas.Also, the most important feature of this region is the implementation of the tour program as a one-day excursion program.
Our second suggestion for your desert program is the 2-day tour of Kashan and Abouzidabad Desert.Spend one day in Kashan and the other day in the desert of Abu Zaidabad.This area is just 30 minutes from Kashan.
In order to enjoy other desert areas in Iran, you need some medium-term plans that Iranian agencies will help you.

Nayband; Tabas
Another landmark of Iran in the fall is the village of Nayband.This desert village is known the Masooleh of Desert.Nayband is located 225 km south of Tabas and adjacent to the Lut desert.Nayband is one of the unique examples of staircase architecture that has been formed in the Lut Desert.In this type of architecture there is a dense set of houses in which the roofs of the houses are used as their upper yard.This architecture has created a solid correlation among the inhabitants of this region.
One of the most prominent and spectacular views of this area is seeing the sky at night with millions of stars.

Forestry; from Naharkhoran Forest to Londvil Forest
Autumn is the best season for walking in the Forest.Trees with thousands of colors and the smell of wet soil are autumn beauty that makes walking in the woods more enjoyable.3 Northern provinces of Iran with dense forests and tall trees will have unforgettable autumn landscapes.For the Trekking Trees in the Autumn make travel to one of these beautiful areas:
Naharkhoran Forest,Gorgan Province.
Asalem to Khalkhal Road,Gilan Province.
Alimestan Forest,Amol,Mazandarn Forest.
LondvilForest,Astara,Gilan Province.
Chamestan Road,Mazandaran Province.

Meybod,Yazd
This small town is located on the edge of the Yazd desert with 45 km distance from Yazd.You can experience four seasons of the year at this time.Spring mornings, summer heat noon, autumn sunset, winter nights and nights, are the autumn gifts for this city.Simultaneously, you can see the beauty of the desert and the old monuments of this city.
Some of these sights are:
Old Carevanseray,PostOffice,StoreWater,OldMosque,Pigeon Tower and Pottery workshops.

Tehran, Ahar Village
Tehran and its surroundings are also beautiful in autumn.You can enjoy the beauty of this great city by staying in Tehran
The villages around Tehran with beautiful forest areas will have nice scenery from autumn.
You can also enjoy these beauties by walking in the parks of Tehran or in the streets.The streets that are covered with long tree as Vali-e-Asr street.

 

 

Trekking Iran’s Lut abandon: a wild, remote experience – in pictures

Iran’s Dasht-e Lut with its mammoth rises, salt fields and kaluts gives an epic excursion of amazing magnificence and wild, as found in these pictures

Iran’s Lut abandon is a powerful place of moving sands and wind-impacted shake arrangements. It is the setting for an epic trek offered by Secret Compass. Here a gathering cross the Mega-Dunes on the eastern flank of the Dasht-e-Lut.
The trekking group assembles to the western edge of the Mega-Dunes.
Support vehicles race across the flat desert plain heading towards the Eye of the Lut.
Pillars of fossilised escarpments in the Eye of the Lut.
Star Dune fields west of the Eye of the Lut.
Remnants of fossilised dune fields west of the Star Dunes.
Descending towards the Kalut valleys of the western Dasht-e-Lut.
Plain leading to the broken escarpments of the Kaluts.
Search for a passageway through the Kalut field.
The Kalut fields nearing the western edge of the Dasht-e-Lut.

 

 

Sand ski
by Ahmad Moghanizade

One of the nice and joyful recreations in Iran is skiing on sand dunes in the deserts of Iran. You can ask for sand ski tours in Yazd travel agencies. The tour is consisting of camel riding, sand dune trekking and sand skiing. Also the tour of camping in the desert is available in Yazd by the travel agencies. In some tours sky watching is also available.