Kerman Economuseum

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Iran’s Economuseum becomes a major tourist attraction
An ancient building in southeastern Iran has become a museum of traditional professions that attracts a large number of visitors.

A historic school in the city of Kerman, in southeastern Iran, has been restored and renovated and renamed “Economuseum”. It is a place where visitors can familiarize themselves with the different traditional professions of the city.

For starters, the Grand Bazaar of Kerman has numerous attractions. Anyone entering the market can spend hours visiting the historical monuments there, including old small workshops. Old men have still kept alive and probably forgotten professions in the province.

According to a Persian report from the Mehr News , one of the ancient monuments in the main hall of the bazaar was recently restored.

Visitors can now see for themselves the traditional professions of Kerman people there. Each camera is dedicated to a certain art and industry. Ceramics, carpet weaving, carpet weaving and a room with symbolic decoration suggesting that Kermanis decorate the rooms of their houses. A public road in the monument is going to be adapted and put into service, too. This place is known as the Lady Bibijan School. The building was opened to the public in 2015 as the Econonomuseum of Professions, which houses visitors and tourists.

The historic building built in 1888 was first used as a joint Iran-UK bank. Later, after the bank was transferred to the British consulate, the building was renovated in 1933 for use by students. In 1941, it was named after the lady “Bibi Hayati”, and was used as a school until 1977. It was then abandoned and extinguished. And several years ago, it was restored and converted into a museum.


Amazing 12,000-year-old, Meymand Village – IRAN TRAVEL | TRIP TO IRAN



Amazing 12,000-year-old, Meymand Village

Man and nature joined together to create one of the most amazing and extraordinary places in the world in southern Iran.
Meymand is a rocky village in the district of Meymand in the central part of the city of Babak in the province of Kerman in southeastern Iran.
Meymand dates back to 8,000 to 12,000 years, is another example of the historic tourist attraction in Iran.
The village of Meymand and the Kandovan rocky village in Tabriz are among the few architectural forms of the rock that are widely used in the entire structure of the villages.

As an example, the most important attributes of these villages in comparison with those of the Cappadocia village of Turkey are the residential units of these two villages.In other words, life is still in this village.
The village was registered on July 4, 2015, at the thirty-nine UNESCO World Heritage Summit as the 19th UNESCO World Herald of Iran.
Meymand Village attracts thousands of tourists eager to see its cavern-like houses and experience the traditional rural culture of the region.
This ancient man-made building is certainly among the first human settlements in Iran.It is not yet known who created this collection, and what were the motives of these people for the construction of such structures.
But the motives of the people are very important,Because with simple facilities, the creation of such magnificent collection with an outstanding architecture is admired.

Some people believe that Mithraism used these caves only for the worship and burial of the dead.And after a while due to the emergence of water and air or any other effective environment, these caves have been chosen to reside.The religion of Mithraism was prevalent in Iran before the advent of Ayn Zoroastrianism and continued until long after its emergence.
At the time of Sasanian, Shahrbabak was considered as the birthplace of Babak Sassanid.After the advent of Islam and its entry into Iran, the people of Meymand who believed in the Zoroastrian religion accepted Islam.

Traditional houses in the village are carved out of the rocks and include corridors, pillars and a stove used to cook and heat the house during glacial winters.Locals say their ancestors did not use hammers and scissors, but a type of pointed stone to sculpt images in rocks. The method is still practiced today in the region.
The current inhabitants of the village build their cave houses, known as Kicheh, by chiseling six to nine-meter horizontal cuts into the hillside’s soft sedimentary rock.Meymand’s sedimentary rocks are soft enough to be shaped by hand and hard enough to support the roof of cave units.
There are about 400 Kitchens in Meymand. Each Kicheh covers an area of about 16 to 20 square meters and is nearly two meters high.

The houses are built on one another and accommodate 130 to 150 people, many of whom lead a nomadic life, escaping warm weather by switching to higher pastures in summer.
The houses usually consist of a single square or round room with carved windows as much as possible. Some houses are windowless and dark due to lack of natural light and soot-coated walls.

Larger houses have more than one room and sometimes an adjacent shelter or animal shelter. The doors are generally rectangular and wooden, with a latch that locks on a hole drilled in a stone frame.
Tourists, who arrive in the village can either stay in guest houses or enjoy staying in cozy, soot-stained cave houses.Guest house rooms are covered with pressed wool felt, called Namad in Persian, and carpets.Meymand also has a public bath, a school, a restaurant, a museum and a number of shops mostly offering herbal medicine and traditional handicrafts.


Trekking Iran’s Lut abandon: a wild, remote experience – in pictures



Trekking Iran’s Lut abandon: a wild, remote experience – in pictures

Iran’s Dasht-e Lut with its mammoth rises, salt fields and kaluts gives an epic excursion of amazing magnificence and wild, as found in these pictures

Iran’s Lut abandon is a powerful place of moving sands and wind-impacted shake arrangements. It is the setting for an epic trek offered by Secret Compass. Here a gathering cross the Mega-Dunes on the eastern flank of the Dasht-e-Lut.
The trekking group assembles to the western edge of the Mega-Dunes.
Support vehicles race across the flat desert plain heading towards the Eye of the Lut.
Pillars of fossilised escarpments in the Eye of the Lut.
Star Dune fields west of the Eye of the Lut.
Remnants of fossilised dune fields west of the Star Dunes.
Descending towards the Kalut valleys of the western Dasht-e-Lut.
Plain leading to the broken escarpments of the Kaluts.
Search for a passageway through the Kalut field.
The Kalut fields nearing the western edge of the Dasht-e-Lut.


Iran Lut Desert | Earth hottest place


The hottest place on Earth as of 2005 is in the Lut Desert in Iran at 70.7 degrees Celsius. This inviting region is abiotic – meaning without life; not even bacteria have been found. The specific hot zone, covering 480 square kilometers is called Gandom Beriyan (the toasted wheat). The high temperatures are party as a result of the dried, black lava rock which absorbs the heat of the desert sun – kind of like walking across a 480 kilometer bed of coals! Kilometers and kilometers of mountains and sand fill corridors between high ridges of rock and 150 meter tall sand dunes.

Coming in at a distant second for hottest place on Earth is Death Valley in California reaching up to 56.6 degrees Celsius on occasion. El Azizia in Northern Africa reached a blistering 66 degrees Celsius in 1922.

Some of you may be wondering what effect global warming is having on the hottest temperatures on the planet. All the national science institutes of the major industrial countries agree that it is happening. Estimates are that the climate will rise in temperature from between 1.1 to 6.4 degrees Celsius over the 21st century. Expect these records to get broken.